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Posts tagged photography


Sep 18, 2014
@ 10:30 pm

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capturedphotos:

The Moon and Stars
28 images combined, each with a 15 second exposure. Taken around 8:30pm at Caspersen Beach, Florida. Stacked using Waguila’s star stacker program and the star spikes program for the diffraction effect. 
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

capturedphotos:

The Moon and Stars

28 images combined, each with a 15 second exposure. Taken around 8:30pm at Caspersen Beach, Florida. Stacked using Waguila’s star stacker program and the star spikes program for the diffraction effect. 

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil


Sep 18, 2014
@ 11:15 am

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10 notes

akapearlofagirl:

We all get so excited when rain is forecasted. This was at sunset in Napa valley yesterday.

akapearlofagirl:

We all get so excited when rain is forecasted. This was at sunset in Napa valley yesterday.



Sep 17, 2014
@ 9:47 pm

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259 notes

lifeisverybeautiful:

Sand Waves by Dhonfuthu on Flickr.

lifeisverybeautiful:

Sand Waves by Dhonfuthu on Flickr.

(via charlesdclimer)



Sep 17, 2014
@ 10:23 am

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39,145 notes

Space Shuttle Atlantis blasting off for the last time, the final launch ever for NASA’s Space Shuttle program. 18-year-old Ryan Graff was lucky enough to be flying to Miami as the Shuttle launched, and captured this photograph of Atlantis’ smoke trail using his iPhone.

Space Shuttle Atlantis blasting off for the last time, the final launch ever for NASA’s Space Shuttle program. 18-year-old Ryan Graff was lucky enough to be flying to Miami as the Shuttle launched, and captured this photograph of Atlantis’ smoke trail using his iPhone.

(Source: danielodowd, via fabforgottennobility)


Sep 17, 2014
@ 10:18 am

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13,830 notes


by (julie ann tingley)

Avalanche Peak, Yellowstone

by (julie ann tingley)

Avalanche Peak, Yellowstone

(Source: R2--D2, via fabforgottennobility)


Sep 15, 2014
@ 12:20 pm

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113,573 notes

plurdledgabbleblotchits:

irish-carbomb:
After hiking for twelve hours out of a nineteen hour trek, it was time to watch the sunrise at Dinosaur Ridge. When we first looked out, the mountains were completely covered by clouds, but within an hour the clouds dropped and this was what we saw. It felt like heaven, and you could hear everyone present for this moment screaming and shouting for joy! I’d never seen something so incredible, I had to meditate and have gratitude to have experienced this. Some locals said that they’d never seen the mountains like this, even in their 40+ years of hiking there. (© Ka Ram Shim/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)

plurdledgabbleblotchits:

irish-carbomb:

After hiking for twelve hours out of a nineteen hour trek, it was time to watch the sunrise at Dinosaur Ridge. When we first looked out, the mountains were completely covered by clouds, but within an hour the clouds dropped and this was what we saw. It felt like heaven, and you could hear everyone present for this moment screaming and shouting for joy! I’d never seen something so incredible, I had to meditate and have gratitude to have experienced this. Some locals said that they’d never seen the mountains like this, even in their 40+ years of hiking there. (© Ka Ram Shim/National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest)

(Source: The Atlantic)


Sep 13, 2014
@ 4:27 pm

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353 notes

Waves by Longland River

Waves by Longland River

(Source: bluepassions, via kamamore)


Sep 13, 2014
@ 3:59 pm

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535 notes


Milky Way on Cannon Beach by Steve Hallmark

Milky Way on Cannon Beach by Steve Hallmark

(via fabforgottennobility)


Sep 13, 2014
@ 3:58 pm

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619 notes

brutalgeneration:

waysidebob (1 of 1) (by G.O.M.E.R. (Randy Baumhover))

brutalgeneration:

waysidebob (1 of 1) (by G.O.M.E.R. (Randy Baumhover))

(via nickyland)



Sep 11, 2014
@ 5:40 pm

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205,303 notes

thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

(via sk007-700ks)


Sep 11, 2014
@ 5:26 pm

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58 notes

Mike Hollingshead

Mike Hollingshead

(Source: citroenzx, via charlesdclimer)


Sep 10, 2014
@ 10:14 am

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94,712 notes

(Source: , via charlesdclimer)


 


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